The Truth About Hemp (And Why Big Business Doesn’t Want You to Know It)

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Top Tier Gear USA

Is a hemp-fueled utopia only a pipe dream? Or could hemp legitimately save the planet?

Did you know that the hemp plant can be used for between 25,000 and 50,000 products? Not just today, either. Historically speaking, hemp was a lifesaver and it signaled the expansion of the world and even expansion of the mind.

However, the big businesses that influence every decision made in our country hate competition and have led the charge in a propaganda war against the plant. Corporatism strikes again!

Here’s the truth about hemp – and why Big Business doesn’t want you to know.

First – Hemp Cannot Get You High

Hemp and marijuana are two different plants! They are in the same family but are different plants. The only “euphoria” you can get from hemp is the giddy feeling you get when you dream of a world run on hemp and what a godsend this magical plant is.

But I promise that’s it. You would have to smoke 2,500 pounds to get high and, of course, that’s humanly impossible. It is only a calculated, 90-year smear campaign against cannabis that propagates such silliness. The restrictions in the U.S. make hemp seem otherworldly when in reality it was among the most ubiquitous materials in history.

Hemp is simply a variety of Cannabis sativa a.k.a. Indian hemp or industrial hemp. It is bred for industrial use. Marijuana (C. Sativa, C. Indica or C. Ruderalis) is a name for a strain of C. Sativa that has the frosty, flowering buds where all the resin (cannabin) hangs out. That’s where the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is, and that’s the stuff that gets you high. Both plants contain some THC, but believe me, “Puff the Magic Dragon” wasn’t code for hemp!

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Contributed by Meadow Clark of The Organic Prepper.

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