The Term “Redneck” Does Not Mean What You Might Think

| |

Top Tier Gear USA

redneck_crossing-300x267

Pastor, Radio Host and Inventor, Billy Redneck recorded LIVE on The Liberty Brothers Radio Show.

When someone uses the word Redneck, images of a pick-up truck with a gun rack and an open 12-pack of beer may come to mind for most. In fact, the popular culture definition of Redneck really paints them in an unfavorable light.

A slang term, usually for a rural white southerner who is politically conservative, racist, and a religious fundamentalist (see fundamentalism). This term is generally considered offensive. It originated in reference to agricultural workers, alluding to how the back of a person’s neck will be burned by the sun if he works long hours in the fields.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition

Despite the popular slang definition of Redneck, the true origins of the word are tied to a much more intelligent, honorable and motivated group of freedom fighters from hundreds of years in the past. The real Rednecks were men and women of strong character and strong conviction, much like our recent guest on The Liberty Brothers Radio Show, Billy Redneck.

Billy Redneck reached out to this writer soon after our second interview with Torah Pastor, Charles Dowell. I had the pleasure of speaking with Billy at length the days leading up to the interview posted below, and all I can say is that listening to Billy impart his Biblical wisdom is like taking a drink of water from a fire-hose. If you are a student of the Torah, and appreciate fiery preaching, make it a point to tune in to Billy’s daily broadcast onClassic Redneck Radio.

Please take the time to listen to our interview with Billy posted below to get the real history of the terms Hillbilly, Redneck and much more.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

We encourage you to share and republish our reports, analyses, breaking news and videos (Click for details).


Contributed by Jim White of The Liberty Brothers Radio Show.

Wake The Flock Up! Please Share With Sheeple Far & Wide:
  • Ratcraft

    Coalminers wore red bandanas around their face to protect from the dust. When they came out of the mine the pulled it down around their neck. Same with anyone working a dirty dusty job. They were called red necks. It is a derogatory term and always has been. Those in the fields wore hats to protect from the sun. Don’t know where that lines comes from.White kids using it today are no different than the black kids who call each other niggras. Just plain ignorant.

  • moovova

    I prefer “bitter clinger”.

  • Dan

    I live back in the woods, you see
    A woman and the kids, and the dogs, and me
    I got a shotgun rifle and a 4-wheel drive
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    I can plow a field all day long
    I can catch catfish from dusk ’til dawn
    We make our own whiskey and our own smoke, too
    Ain’t too many things these ole boys can’t do
    We grow good ole tomatoes and homemade wine
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    Because you can’t starve us out
    And you can’t makes us run
    ‘Cause one-of-’em old boys raised on shotgun
    And we say grace and we say Ma’am
    And if you ain’t into that we don’t give a damn

    We came from the West Virginia coalmines
    And the Rocky Mountains and the and the western skies
    And we can skin a buck; we can run a trot line
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    http://youtu.be/3cQNkIrg-Tk

  • Worn Wranglers

    I am a redneck.

    I rarely drink and have never taken illegal drugs. I have never been in jail. I have never committed an act of cruelty on an animal, a woman, or a child. I have a degree from a prestigious college, have worked continuously for the last 25 years, built my own home in the country, and have never accepted any gov’mint aid. While I speak fluent sarcasm, I am not homophobic and judge individuals on the content of their character, not the color of their skin. I’m now retired, long before the “mandatory age of retirement” with more than enough to provide for me and mine until I die. I am pro-market, anti-war, and believe that Keynesian economics are an utter failure.

    But I AM a redneck and find no offense in the use of the term.