Love your dog? Don’t call the cops

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Flipping on the radio during my early commute Monday landed me smack dab in the middle of one of those morning zoos which instantly reminded me why I never flip on the radio during early commutes (and especially not on Mondays).

The debate centered around cops shooting dogs. Apparently police officers from Round Rock, Texas had responded to a burglary alarm at a private residence, and arrived to find the front door ajar. They went inside to sweep the house, only to be confronted by the home owner’s eight-year-old, 120-pound rottweiler with hip dysplasia.

The officers proceeded to reportedly shoot the animal a combined total of seven times; one officer firing one round, while the other fired six.

The debate centered around what people thought. One of the deejays argued that the Round Rock PD had already offered to buy the owners a new dog, so it was ridiculous that “some ambulance chaser” would wind up getting them an additional 100-500k for pain and suffering on top of it. The seemingly obligatory female deejay played the sympathetic role, talking about how the pet was the residence owners’ baby. Then some guy called in with the rebuttal that a dog “can’t make no woman pregnant” so therefore it doesn’t count as family (couldn’t make that one up if I tried).

Officers killing dogs in “the line of duty” — how common is this becoming in modern America? Seems like no more than three days go by before I hear about a new pet dog slain at the hands of police who, in most cases, were called for help.

A bunch of thoughts instantly ran through my head during the radio show debate, most all of which I found were (conveniently) summed up for me in the comments section of this Austin American-Statesman’s story about the dog shooting:

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dogshotcomment22

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The only thing I didn’t immediately find was the thought that this really just makes those cops look weak and pathetic as far as police officers are supposed to be concerned. Cops are supposed to “protect and serve,” no? To be so scared of a dog that you don’t A) just shut the door instead, B) get the hell out of there or, even C) result to using a taser, but instead instantly unload seven shots into a dog says a lot about you.

Itchy trigger finger, much? What if the couple’s child had been in the home? Elderly relative with a hearing problem?

Someone who reacts to a dog inside the dog’s own home by instantly mowing it down with bullets isn’t necessarily someone I would ever want to call when I’m in trouble.

But that last commenter makes the real point here. Used to be, we lived in a society where if you thought your house was being or had been broken into, your first inclination might be to call the police for help.

Now we live in a police state, and if you own a dog, you might want to think carefully about how much your stuff is worth before you dial 9-1-1. Are your belongings worth more than the life of your pet? More and more, that’s the choice people have to make in modern America.

Sure, you might read this story and say, “Yeah, but that dog was a 120-pound rottweiler. That’s a seriously scary dog (not always true, but go on). If you were a police officer and that dog was coming at you (something we don’t know for sure even happened in this case), you might do the same.”

Fine. Say that. But it doesn’t really explain why cops are also responding to 9-1-1 calls and killing everything from an 11-year-old, 12-pound dachshund, to a pregnant chihuahua, to a freaking puppy, does it? Because those dogs were all shot by cops in “the line of duty” too.

They do it, and all they have to do to justify it is say they felt threatened (via Huffington Post):

When police officers shoot dogs, departments usually deem the shooting justified if the officer felt threatened by the animal. But an officer’s perception doesn’t always mean the animal actually was a threat. In recent years, police officers have shot and killed chihuahuas, miniature dachshunds, Wheaton terriers, and Jack Russell terriers. Last month, a California police officer shot and killed a boxer puppy and pregnant chihuahua, claiming the boxer had threatened him. The chihuahua, he said, got caught in the crossfire. When a San Bernardino, Calif., woman called police to report a burglary in progress behind her house last month, they responded, jumped her fence to confront the burglars, then shot her dalmatian mix, Julio. He survived. Police officers have also recently shot dogs that were chained, tied, or leashed — obviously posing no real threat to officers who killed them. [emphasis added]

Why are cops, those supposed societal protectors, so easily “threatened” by seemingly any dog? It goes without saying (but typing that means I’m saying it anyway) that if you are a police officer who is so utterly jumpy and easily scared that a pregnant chihuahua threatens you, at the very least you are probably in the wrong line of work.

National records are not being officially kept on how many dogs are shot by cops in “the line of duty” each year; I think it’s safe to say that if they were, the figures would probably horrify most people.

Oh, and if you are lucky recipient of a no knock raid, it’s apparently almost guaranteed your dog is going to die (even if you are innocent and the cops just accidentally went to the wrong house, which is also occurring more and more these days):

In drug raids, killing any dog in the house has become almost perfunctory. In this video of a 2008 drug raid in Columbia, Mo., you can see police kill two dogs, including one as it retreats. Despite police assurance that the dogs were menacing, the video depicts the officers discussing who will kill the dogs before they even arrive at the house. During a raid in Durham, N.C., last year, police shot and killed a black Lab they claimed “appeared to growl and make aggressive moves.” But in video of the raid taken by a local news station, the dog appears to make no such gestures. [emphasis added] (source)

Just out of curiosity, I typed “police kill dog” into a search engine just to see what would pop up from the past month. One of the first returns was a Google+ posting via The Free Thought Project from May 8, 2014. It was titled, “15 Stories of Cops killing dogs”:

Police Execute Dog Outside 5-Year-Old’s Bedroom Window
Read more: http://bit.ly/1qeeiwz

Cop Walks up to a Couple’s Tied Up Dog and Shoots it in the Head for No Reason – http://bit.ly/1pWK1lE

If Cops Treat Their Own Dogs Like This, It is No Wonder They Shoot Everyone Else’s – http://bit.ly/PUgyIw

Cell Phone Video Surfaces of Man whose Dog Was Shot After Dialing 911 – http://bit.ly/QBiXZA

Cop Tries to Shoot Dog, Shoots Himself Instead
Read more: http://bit.ly/RImrKI

The Gamble of Dialing 9-1-1: Another Family Dog Killed by Police After Call For ‘Help’ – http://bit.ly/1fZNmMS

Cop Shoots and Kills Family Dog While it was on a Leash
Read more: http://bit.ly/1g5NDes

Cop Shoots Man’s Service Dog During His 9 Year Old Son’s Birthday
Read more: http://bit.ly/1glFFwM

Cop Charged With Official Oppression for Beating Entire Family & Kicking Their Dog: http://bit.ly/1mGfCH8

Man Calls 911 to Report a Burglary, Cop Shows Up Shoots his Dog and Leaves it Suffering – http://bit.ly/RImrKI

Cops Break Into Private Property and Shoot Owner’s Dog After Serving A Warrant to the Wrong House – http://bit.ly/Khj9d5

Family Outraged, Cops Shoot Dog in Front of 2 Year Old
Read more: http://bit.ly/1j7eNyy

Cops Kill Man’s Dogs for not Letting them Illegally Search his Home – http://bit.ly/1izGWo2

Cop with Sinister Past, Murders Family Pet and Brags About It
Read more: http://bit.ly/1jheUKn

Baltimore Cop Kills Girlfriend’s Puppy, Texts Her Photos
Read more: http://bit.ly/1e7HVVm

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Like I said, there’s no shortage of stories. This sort of thing happens all the time nowadays.

In the aftermath of the Round Rock dog shooting, the Texas Humane Legislation Network has come forward to demand new legislation that would require officers to take an eight-hour training course to distinguish aggressive dog behavior.

Executive Assistant and Government Relations staffer for THLN Stacy Sutton Kerby told KXAN News, “Anytime a canine approaches an officer, that doesn’t mean they’re necessarily coming to attack.”

Seems pretty common sense. In fact, that’s a near textbook definition of a common sense comment. It’s so common sense in fact, that it begs the question: does it even need to be said?

Yes, because apparently common sense has fallen by the wayside.

As such, it’s no longer common sense to call the cops if your house gets robbed and you own a dog, unless your possessions are worth more than your pet.

 

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Contributed by Melissa Dykes of The Daily Sheeple.

Melissa Dykes is a writer, researcher, and analyst for The Daily Sheeple and a co-creator of Truthstream Media with Aaron Dykes, a site that offers teleprompter-free, unscripted analysis of The Matrix we find ourselves living in. Melissa also co-founded Nutritional Anarchy with Daisy Luther of The Organic Prepper, a site focused on resistance through food self-sufficiency. Wake the flock up!

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  • sharonsj

    If yours is not a sarcastic comment, then someone needs to shoot you and make the world a better place.

  • Rick E.

    The cops are on a mission. A mission on a battlefield of their making. Nothing is to get in the way of that mission. No distractions, obstacles, or impediments to that mission are allowed.
    The mission is to subjugate, enforce the law, intimidate, kill the obstacle in front of them.
    To them, this IS a battlefield, a war mindset, with routine violence the rule-not the exception! WE ARE the enemy, and we are to be regarded as vermin in their eyes.
    THIS is why our dogs and us, are getting murdered virtually weekly-sometimes several times a week now.
    Compare that to how many times the cops get snuffed out.
    This must stop before the general populace grow tired of the oppression and tyranny in this rapidly developing police state!

  • crazy2medic

    If I call the police for help and they show up and kill my dog on my property, the war is on, and payback is a b*tch

    • Colleen

      If they know there are dogs on the premises why not come with a tranquiler gun? If ANYONE shot my dog regardless of whether I called them or not, I would defend myself/property. And I would charge them, even if it is found to be a justifiable shooting, that would not preclude a civil suit. Why doesn’t the SPCA or other animal activists protest this. It appears that it is becoming the norm.

      Since it seems evident that Police are no longer there to protect the citizen then why do the citizens keep calling them. Lets try a neighbor hood watch, or a phone tree or something where when one person is threatened the neighbors come to help. They would probably already know the dog and would not harm it. In this type of society we have to trust that when we need help we will get it. So our family, friends and neighbors seem the best choice. I live in a small town and we have a volunteer fire department, we could expand this service to include local security too couldn’t we?

      People should band together for protection.