Alert: US Dog Food Recalled After Found to Contain Fatal Dose of Euthanasia Drug — But Why Is It There?

| |

Top Tier Gear USA

dog wikimedia

by Vicki Batts

Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food has recently issues a recall on some of their products after traces of a potentially lethal drug were found in their food.

Pentobarbital is a sedative normally used to euthanize horses, cats, and dogs.

Evanger’s Hunk of Beef Dog Food is currently the only product suspected of contamination. The manufacturer is subsequently voluntarily recalling all Hunk of Beef items bearing lot numbers that start with 1816E03HB, 1816E04HB, 1816E06HB, 1816E07HB, and 1816E13HB, and have an expiration date of June 2020. The FDA reports that the second half of the bar-code should read, “20109,” and it can be located on the back of the product label.

These five lots of food are the sole focus of the recall, as they were all produced with the same lot of beef from the same supplier that is specifically used for the Hunk of Beef product.

The FDA reports that while the majority of the potentially contaminated food has been pulled from store shelves, they advise that “if consumers still have cans with the aforementioned lot numbers, he or she should return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.”

So far, five dogs have reportedly been affected by consuming this tainted product, and one sadly passed away. The deceased pup had consumed food bearing the lot number 1816E06HB13.

Talula, the pug who passed away, had eaten the food on New Year’s Eve. Three other dogs in the same household also experienced negative effects from consuming the pentobarbital-tainted food. Mrs. Mael, the pets’ parent, commented, “I fed them one can and within 15 minutes, they were acting drunk, walking around, they couldn’t … they were falling over.”

Fortunately, Talula’s three “siblings,” Tito, Tank, and Tinkerbell, survived after an emergency trip to the vet. Talula’s post-mortem examination revealed that pentobarbital was the cause of death.

Evanger’s has reportedly paid for all of the dogs’ medical bills and donated to an animal shelter in Talula’s honor. The dog food company has also paid for the medical bills of two other dogs.

In a statement, Evanger’s said, “We feel that we have been let down by our supplier, and in reference to the possible presence of pentobarbital, we have let down our customers.”

The company, which claims to only use USDA-approved beef for their food, also commented that they had thought “something like this seemed impossible.” Evanger’s has also “terminated” a 40-year relationship with their beef supplier — which also supplies to other pet food companies.

The source of contamination is still not yet known, but the company says that they will continue to investigate.  It is the first recall Evanger’s has had to issue across their 82 years in the pet food industry. (RELATED: Learn more about toxic food ingredients at Ingredients.news)

Oddly enough, the FDA has already examined the potential side effects pentobarbital may have on pets: the federal agency has even conducted a study on how much of the sedative needs to be present in a dog’s kibble to do harm.

The research, done some 15 years ago now, concluded that the most pentobarbital a dog would likely consume was 4 micrograms per kilogram of bodyweight per day — an amount they concluded was “harmless.” Of course, these findings only pertained to dry kibble; Hunk of Beef is a canned food.

Regardless, the FDA has suspected that pentobarbital was present in dog food for at least the last 15 years — they even noted in their study, “Presently, it is assumed that the pentobarbital residues are entering pet foods from euthanized, rendered cattle or even horses.”

While the researchers found pentobarbital poisoning to be unlikely, it has become a reality: the amount of penobarbital in dog food — at least canned dog food — does have the potential to be harmful.

And it certainly makes you wonder: is pentobarbital in human food, too?

Sources:

BBC.com

NPR.org

FDA.gov

FDA.gov

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

We encourage you to share and republish our reports, analyses, breaking news and videos (Click for details).


Contributed by NaturalNews Network of NaturalNews.com.

The NaturalNews Network is a non-profit collection of public education websites covering topics that empower individuals to make positive changes in their health, environmental sensitivity, consumer choices and informed skepticism. The NaturalNews Network operates without a profit incentive, and its key writer, Mike Adams, receives absolutely no payment for his time, articles or books. The NaturalNews Network is not for sale, and does not accept money to cover any story (or to spike it). NaturalNews Network is what the news industry used to be, before it sold out to big business.

Wake The Flock Up! Please Share With Sheeple Far & Wide:
  • ReverendDraco✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ ᵃᶜᶜᵒᵘᶰᵗ

    It also gets into pet food supplies through the euthanized, rendered cats and dogs that are in most pet foods. This is nothing new, been going on for decades.

    • NonYo Business

      If people only knew what their foods did to them… Never buy microwave food, packages = cancer.

      • <<<<<< Leftard Enema

        People are damned fools being hung out to dry.

  • endofwatchersbegan1/28/2011

    “Where’s the Beef” FROM? maybe it was really intended to be consumed by humans somewhere down the line.

  • SP_88

    I don’t understand why anyone would poison an animal to death that was going to be used for food. Especially if they were using a toxic substance that will remain in the meat until it is consumed.
    Too many companies, especially big companies, are willing to put profit before safety. You can’t trust anyone anymore.

  • mothman777

    Around 67% of all dogs fed canned dog food get cancer as a result anyway, due to all the condemned carcasses they put in there, including those of euthanized pets, ah, perhaps that is where the euthanasia drug has come from. Maybe someone foolishly used a batch of euthanized animals for that entire batch of petfood.

  • Ken, Megapolis

    People get buried in graves. You see them in every churchyard. But when was the last time you saw a horse grave?
    Go figure.

  • g.johnon

    probably a good idea to keep a closer eye on people food too.

  • BonnieC3

    Dogs and cats euthanized at shelters often end up at rendering plants. Vets have been saying for years it’s taking larger doses of euthanasia drugs to put animals down as they have acquired tolerance due to consuming it in pet food. Don’t believe it? Do your own research. Look into what goes into “meat and bone meal”, then look on your pet’s food label.